Important Links

Hock's Blog

Hock's Downloads

CQC-Facebook

Hock's Facebook

Hock's Seminars

Hock's Shopsite

Hock's Web Page


New Products

Combat Kicks VID

Critical Contact VID

Death Grip of Knife VID

Dominant/Counter VID

First Contact VID

Impact Weapons Book

Knife Book

The Other Hand VID


Lauric Enterprises, Inc.
1314 W. McDermott
Ste 106-811
Allen, TX 75013
972-390-1777

 

 

 


W. Hock Hochheim's

           Combat Centric

Talk Forum for Military, Police, Martial Artists and Aware Citizenry



Hock Hochheim's Combat Talk Forum

  • October 21, 2018, 11:12:44 PM
  • Welcome, Guest
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Induced physical Stress to Improve knife/conuter knife training?  (Read 2779 times)

Ed Giglio

  • Level 1
  • **
  • Posts: 43
    • Invictus Solutions

Good-morning all!

I just wanted to know what you all thought of induced physical stress for improving knife/ counter knife training.

I clearly remember one of my first private lessons with Joe which involved him beasting me through countless pushups followed by as many squats as I could muster before taking me through the saving private Ryan scenario. Needless to say I was shaking all over from exhaustion and only the bridge and shrimp allowed me to escape the knife stab. This got me thinking...had I not been physically pressured before undertaking the scenario I probably would have tried to fight force on force before trying something else. But since I was absolutely exhausted my mind was screaming for me to end the situation ASAP.

Conclusion? Physical stress before scenarios is a great way to test how hard-wired your skills are. After all, special forces and other elite units all use induced physical stress as the ultimate test to see if the members are up-to scratch. So why not use it in our training also?

« Last Edit: January 10, 2005, 08:49:28 PM by Joe Hubbard »
Logged

RobC

  • Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Re: Induced physical Stress to Improve knife/conuter knife training?
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2005, 04:12:33 AM »

I had a similar experience whilst training a while back which caused me to seriously rethink my whole edged combatives methodology, as well as the type of instructor that I should consider training under ... During the course of that evening I really came to learn the value of gross motor movements and that under the stress of "battle" you can really throw all the fine movements out the door !!

It still amazes me how many schools/organizations etc out there still do not apply the concept of progressive resistance training, especially in their edged weapon curriculums ... As Guro Dave Gould keeps saying "If you want to learn how to fight, you must learn to do so against someone who is fighting back".

I hope you all have a wonderful day.

BE well !!

RobertC
Logged

Hock

  • Administrator
  • Level 4
  • *****
  • Posts: 6324
    • www.HocksCQC.com
Re: Induced physical Stress to Improve knife/conuter knife training?
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2005, 04:44:33 AM »

"If you want to learn how to fight, you must learn to do so against someone who is fighting back".

Eventually yes.

It is like saying, "The only way to learn how to play football is by playing football. "

Sure, you will learn a lot that way. But you can make a person more skillful and successful by separating them from the game and working on isolated physical skills. Without skill practice there is no real growth.

I am always leary of people who proclaim blanketly "Learn to fight by Fighting." Yeeeaaaah BUT! You can also do much better.

The combat scenario, as real as possible is the best prep for the real thing

Someone mentioned doing a bunch of push ups before engaging in a knife ground scenario? That method of training has been around for decades in some militaries and is popular I'd say...oh...15 years now or so in good police training.

Do a one hundred yard dash, stop and shoot at a target far enough away to mandate using your sights...watch the barrel go up and down and up and down with every chest heave.

Hock

Kentbob

  • JOAT
  • Level 4
  • *****
  • Posts: 2107
  • Sound the horn and call the cry
    • Antrim Self-Protection
Re: Induced physical Stress to Improve knife/conuter knife training?
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2005, 10:09:05 AM »

Yeah, roger, Hock.  You are talking about a stress shoot, which I think is a valuable training tool, one that we don't use  often enough in my opinion.  We always start, calm cool and collected, with live rounds, and go in the door.  But when training against a live enemy, things become...wait for it...CHAOTIC!  And the people don't always "die" like the pop up targets do.  So, I have to agree, that this "stress shoot" concept is a very valuable tool, when used correctly, just like everything else.


Kent
Logged
"Specialization is for insects."-Robert A. Heinlein

http://antrimmasp.blogspot.com/

plouffeka

  • Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11
Re: Induced physical Stress to Improve knife/conuter knife training?
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2005, 06:19:32 PM »

I do the induced physical stress thing for testing.  After the students get some hours training and creating muscle memory and it is time to assess - then I get them huffing and puffing and say "Now do this..."

Keith
Logged

Trembula

  • Guest
Re: Induced physical Stress to Improve knife/conuter knife training?
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2005, 08:56:38 PM »

The Elvis song "Don't Be Cruel" reminded me of a tactical folder class segment I taught once. It was a fateful class as I lost two deployment trainers somehow, but I think the folks there learned a valuable lesson that offsets my loss.

I had them do a hundred reps of "grabbing air" with their hands, pushups, more grabbers, and a couple of more arm-intensive exercises. Then the students had to deploy a training folder. When one's forearm muscles are in agony, pinching the knife to pull it out, locating the thumbstud, and even holding onto the open knife is rather challenging.

The big takeaways were:
- Bigger folders are easier to open under durress, those little tiny and slender folders are hard to grab and harder to locate the thumbstud and open
- Once again, the EKI "Wave" helps reduce the fumble factor
- Practice with a trainer that is identical in orientation, locking, and opening to your "real" knife.


Dan
Logged
 

Download