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Author Topic: The Mexico Escape  (Read 8830 times)

Hock

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The Mexico Escape
« on: February 02, 2005, 01:29:20 AM »

...back from the 4 day Las Vegas camp and want to do a little reporting...

Tuesday and Wednesday before the UNLV classes Steve Krystek and team took a group through their live fire set ups north of Vegas, from which all were thrilled and completely satisfied.   

On Sunday, "back at the ranch" (at UNLV) we had simulated-ammo, gun day. And we did one of my protection scenarios- "The Mexico Escape." [
The so-called Bodyguard/Protection Module of my gun course consists of
<> Lecture
<> A background in live-fire, range training
<> Tactical knowledge from Gun/Counter-Gun Levels 1, 2, 3, 6, 7
<> A "walking" scenario
<> A driving scenario


The Mexico Escape is the walking scenario. It is based on the premise that a State Department team is escorting a drug cartel witness over the border to testify. The transport is ambushed and the team (four or five guys, and an unarmed VIP/witness) rush into a near Mexican, business, building lobby to escape.

There in the lobby they discover by radio that a certain described State Dept. escape vehicle is now out to back to whisk them away. They must work their way through the building and out to get to the vehicle. Some of the cartel bad guys were already in the school as part of the vehicle ambush. Some are running to the school.


This is an exercise in bodyguard work as well as search methods.The scenario is over when the survivors sit in the escape car. They fight their way though halls, rooms, closets, bathrooms, parking lots, fake dead...you name it.

(A handy roll of masking tape acts as symbolic tactical medicine fix to patch on a team member or VIP. This at least makes you think about the wounded.)

Run the State team members through so everyone gets to be a VIP once. Then switch groups so the bad guys can be the good guys. The diversity of possibilities, tricks and ambushes are great. Like football plays, what worked once doesn't work again...You can't beat this training. At the end of each run we have a quick AAR (after action review) to slice and dice the events.

Mike Gillette stood by and moderated the LOCAL POLICE and they arrived to see what the hell was going on. There were many outdoor shoot-outs, out-back by the escape vehicle.

In order to replicate this you need quite a diverse facility. The events are easily built upon. You can start with the street ambush, and end with vehicle escape drive-off. One thing you absolutely need is at least one person that is enlightened enough to properly critique the performance. Getting together with a bunch of paint-ballers and having a picnic like this is not maximizing quality training time.

Meanwhile, The other half of the attendees were down the hall and in the basement of this UNLV building, working flashlight drills and searches. This segment was lead by a Military and government vet named "Bryan"- a Krystek PFC team member.

The entire group switched mid-day. Those doing the Mexico Escape traded into the light course and vice-versa.

These are all scenarios that Steve and I are developing through the years. I must report that Steve K's team continues to grow with superlative solutions and innovative training. High-speed, top-notch material people and tactics. Mere mortals don't get to see this master's degree stuff. Consider yourself lucky, very lucky if you do.

Steve K. is trying to travel some with me some this year. Watch the seminar schedule. We need nearby live-fire ranges. We will be doing some of these scenarios in Fredericksburg, VA gun seminar this Fall and any place we can find a diverse enough building in your area to do one by you.
 
(P.S..... MAN! That was just gun day! Jeez! GET to the freaken Vegas camp next January will ya! 2006 info is already posted on the seminar pre-reg page.)

Hock
« Last Edit: February 02, 2005, 04:41:36 AM by HockHoch@aol.com »
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Chuck Burnett

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2005, 02:36:28 PM »

Great camp as always, Hock. Lots of new insights to take back to work.

I really appreciate Mike's liason with the gendarmes.
It was a little disconcerting to bust out of a door, airsoft pistol in hand, and see the the two campus cops giving me the big eyes. :o

Chuck
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Rawhide

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2005, 09:49:22 PM »

I'm sure that was rather awkward, Chuck!  ;)
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Hock

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2005, 02:01:29 PM »

Mexican Police Fire on Federal Convoy from ASSOCIATED PRESS

MEXICO CITY (AP) -- Municipal police in the violence-wracked northern border city of Nuevo Laredo opened fire on a convoy of federal agents sent to bolster security in the area, the Mexican attorney general's office reported Sunday.

One federal agent was severely injured Saturday as more than 40 Nuevo Laredo police intercepted five vehicles carrying members of Mexico's Federal Agency of Investigation.
The convoy apparently had identified itself as carrying federal agents, but local police opened fire anyway, the attorney general's office reported. It is not uncommon for Mexican organized crime groups to pose as federal law enforcement officials.

The shooting came three days after the Nuevo Laredo police chief was gunned down within hours of taking office. Located across the U.S. border from Laredo, Texas, Nuevo Laredo has been caught in a bloody turf battle between Mexico's two main drug gangs.

In March, President Vicente Fox sent hundreds of soldiers and federal agents to the border city to restore order. But the death of police chief Alejandro Dominguez - on top of more than 60 people killed in Nuevo Laredo since January - has renewed fears.
U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Tony Garza issued a statement Thursday decrying ''the rapidly degenerating situation along the border and the near-lawlessness in some parts.''

On Saturday, Special Operations police and federal troops were called in to end the standoff, and at least 40 city police officers were detained and their weapons confiscated. The convoy was carrying 27 federal agents who had recently arrived at an airport and were traveling to local base of the attorney general's office.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2005, 02:24:12 PM by HockHoch@aol.com »
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Hock

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2005, 03:41:18 PM »

Mexican border town struggles to deal with corrupt police force
BY ALFREDO CORCHADO of The Dallas Morning News


NUEVO LAREDO, Mexico - (KRT) - When Eduardo Santos saw a car robbery happening practically in front of his house last weekend, his first thought was to call the police. His second thought was that maybe the cops were the robbers.

He was right. When he went with the victim to recover the car from the impound lot, Santos said, he recognized the robbers among the police officers.

"They're all corrupt," said Santos, 21, a university student majoring in computer science. "When I see them, I usually hurry my step."

In this besieged border city, the concept of a police officer as someone to go to for help has been turned on its head. In Nuevo Laredo, a cop is suspect, someone to avoid. Many residents say that for years they have lived in fear of their local police.

Most residents in Nuevo Laredo - and many across Mexico - simply don't report crimes, even serious offenses such as robberies, rapes or kidnappings. They don't trust the police and feel they would just be wasting time filing a report.

More than 90 percent of all crimes in Mexico never are solved, according to statistics from the country's attorney general's office.

How corrupt are police in Nuevo Laredo? In the federal government's ongoing Operation Safe Mexico, in which federal officers were sent to take over law enforcement duties in the city, local officers were temporarily relieved of duty and investigated for possible involvement in crime.

Of the estimated 720 officers who underwent drug, polygraph and psychological tests and backgrounds checks, 290 had been cleared to return to work as early as today, state officials said.

"Masked people assault peaceful people, and they are no X or Z gang," said one radio commentator. "They are the police. We have a cancer here."

Ramon Martin Huerta, federal secretary of public security, said, "Corruption is an evil that batters society. I don't see a sector that's beyond the reach of corruption."

Martin Huerta said so far, 104 suspected criminals were being held in the operation, which covers the states of Baja California, Sinaloa and Tamaulipas. He said 206 Nuevo Laredo police were in custody and that federal authorities had confiscated 104 firearms. He said of 41 city officers arrested this week after an altercation with federal officers, at least 13 were likely to be charged. Tamaulipas Gov. Eugenio Hernandez Flores said some local officers who passed the tests would be back at work today, assisted by state police.

"We will start from zero," the governor said. "We want Nuevo Laredo to have a trustworthy police force, and we'll be here permanently with a long-term plan to make the police force of Nuevo Laredo to be the best along the border of Tamaulipas. We will not skimp on resources to assist the city."

Some residents said they are not looking forward to the return of the local officers. In March, Yolanda, a 34-year-old mother of three, returned home to find her TV and living room lamps gone. She reported the robbery because her insurance company required her to do so.

Yolanda, who asked that her last name not be used, said two officers arrived and took a report of the incident. After they left, she noticed that her stereo and her son's Nintendo were gone. Angry, she called the station and reported what had happened. Shortly thereafter, one of the two officers called back.

"Call again and we'll take your car, too," she recalled him saying. "Imagine my disgust and fear. We're better off without them."

Residents don't particularly trust anyone in a uniform, whether local, state or even federal officers. Residents are well aware that the two paramilitary groups - the Zetas and the Men in Black - who are battling each other on behalf of rival drug cartels, include people who used to be members of federal elite forces.

This week, bystanders gathered outside a municipal police station as federal soldiers surrounded the block. Inside the station were blue-uniformed members of the city police force. Esther Duran said she was glad that Mexican army troops, clad in olive green, and federal agents, in black, had arrived. Asked if she trusted them, she hesitated and then said,

"Si."But sometimes there are people in the streets and they are dressed in uniforms and they detain you and you find out they are mafia," she said, throwing her hands up.

Some said the outsiders brought some peace of mind but complained about the expected short stay of the federal agents and troops, many of whom roamed the streets toting AR-15 assault rifles and 9mm pistols.

"They just came here to tease us," said Juan de la Rosa, a merchant downtown, where the violence has hit hard economically. "I beg of them not to leave."

For the first time in months, Thelma Morales, 34, permitted her two sons, Francisco and Juan, to play outside after school.

"I felt so safe with the presence of the federal government here," she said. "If they leave, then this will worsen my worst suspicion that this was just a show."

The federal government insists that is not the case. The Nuevo Laredo campaign, they say, is part of an effort to clean up police forces in at least 14 cities nationwide. The Mexican military, army special forces and AFI, Mexico's equivalent of the FBI, are not just parading through the streets, officials said. They have taken over some installations in an operation presidential spokesman Ruben Aguilar described as "purifying the police force."

"In our society, there is no room for criminals," said President Vicente Fox, as he called on Congress to approve tough penalties for wayward law enforcement officials in cahoots with drug traffickers. "We're after them, and we will make them pay for their crimes. There won't be a truce or weak hand."

Some in Nuevo Laredo, however, aren't quite ready to believe. Mirla Mata, 21, who has a son and daughter, said that when it comes to crime, she follows the advice of her husband. If something happens, he told her, she should not report it because the police cannot be trusted.

"Don't call the police. Call no one but me," he told her.

Mata's husband is a Nuevo Laredo police officer.

BY ALFREDO CORCHADO of The Dallas Morning News

Hock

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2005, 05:58:01 PM »

June 22, 2005 Wednesday
METRO Edition 
 
80 cops get the ax in Nuevo Laredo
 Jeorge Zarazua, EXPRESS-NEWS STAFF WRITER
 

NUEVO LAREDO, Mexico -- The mayor of this embattled city announced Tuesday that nearly 80 police officers have been fired for failing to pass a screening process started as a result of a recent shootout between local and federal officers.

Nuevo Laredo Mayor Daniel Peña said the officers were terminated for violating various administrative policies, ranging from absenteeism to more severe charges of flunking drug tests.

City spokesman Alberto Rodriguez said up to 70 other officers are in jeopardy of losing their jobs before the end of the week.

Combined, that would mean pronouncing unfit for duty about one-fifth of the 700-plus department responsible for preventive security in this city of more than 400,000, a crucial funnel point for truck and train cargo between the United States and Mexico.

Unlike in the United States, municipal police officers in Mexico aren't authorized to conduct investigations. That responsibility lies with state or federal authorities, depending on the severity of the crime.

Also on Tuesday, Peña spoke of the possibility that a new police chief could be named for Nuevo Laredo as early as today, but officials later retracted the announcement.

A scheduled City Council meeting was abruptly canceled after officials said the mayor had to travel out of town. No other details were given, including when the council would meet again.

The fired cops were the first to lose their jobs after the city's officers were pulled off the street last week to allow federal agents to ferret out corruption within the force. Officers were suspended with pay and must report to the station for their shifts, where they spend the time in an uncomfortable limbo, sitting around reading newspapers.

The ongoing federal investigation of the local police force was triggered after 41 city police officers engaged in a shootout June 11 with federal agents dressed in civilian clothing. An agent of the Agencia Federal de Investigacion or AFI, Mexico's equivalent of the FBI, was critically wounded.

City officials say the shooting was accidental, but the officers involved remain under arrest in an undisclosed location in Mexico City, Rodriguez said.

The shootout occurred days after additional AFI agents were dispatched to Nuevo Laredo to investigate the June 8 killing of its new police chief, Alejandro Dominguez, who was shot six hours after being sworn in.

Hock

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2005, 11:27:17 AM »

From the San Antonio Express-News  June 15, 2005 Wednesday
 
Body count climbs in Nuevo Laredo 
by Jesse Bogan, EXPRESS-NEWS BORDER BUREAU
 

NUEVO LAREDO, Mexico -- As federal and state law enforcement agencies patrol the streets of this city, one man was shot to death and another body was found early Tuesday, torched in a vehicle.

"Two More Executed!" screamed the headline in El Correo de Nuevo Laredo.

Still, the governor of the state of Tamaulipas said a "heavy blow" was being dealt to organized crime.

The violence, a frequent occurrence in recent weeks, came as hundreds of officers and soldiers have patrolled the streets and stood guard as part of a national initiative called Operation Safe Mexico.

President Vicente Fox unleashed the program to fight the drug cartels that have wreaked havoc mainly in border communities in a battle for control of narcotics shipping routes into the U.S.

This city of some 400,000 is one of at least a dozen communities to be targeted in the operation so far.

"The federal and state government is carrying out an important operation together to be able to combat organized crime," Gov. Eugenio Flores Hernandez said in an interview here. "And we are also working on cleaning up the municipal Police Department."

This city has been reeling as the violence has overtaken its police force, including last week's killing of a new police chief hours after he took office.

A federal agent was wounded in a weekend shooting between federal officers and municipal cops.

Forty-one city police officers were arrested after the shooting and flown to Mexico City to be questioned. At least 13 of them already were the targets of criminal investigations.

The wounded agent's condition has been upgraded to stable, officials said.

Federal and state authorities continue to be on call for the Police Department's normal responsibilities after taking most of the city cops' weapons and keys to vehicles Monday.

Municipal police haven't been allowed to resume their jobs, although the Mexican army Tuesday stopped standing guard outside each police station.

"The people have always criticized us," said city police officer Rigoberto Ramirez Dominguez, one of dozens of local lawmen standing around at police headquarters. "They are never content. There are good cops."

Mayor Daniel Peña Treviño said the screening for corrupt cops included drug tests and background checks.

Hock

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2005, 07:16:10 AM »

Mexican state officer, civilian gunned down in border city
The Associated Press

NUEVO LAREDO, Mexico- Authorities on Monday were searching for gunmen who shot to death a state police officer and a second man in separate assaults in this violence-plagued city across the U.S. border from Laredo, Texas.

State police officer Jose Noel Vives was shot 15 times as he left his fiancee's house on Sunday night. He died instantly, said police investigator Eduardo Anaya.

In a separate incident hours before dawn Monday, two brothers were shot by unidentified attackers during a family gathering at their house, Anaya said.

Arturo Puente Alonso, 28, died at a hospital after receiving two gunshot wounds, to the head and abdomen. His brother Luis Enrique, 30, suffered a nonfatal gunshot wound to the right arm.

Nuevo Laredo is on the front line of a battle between Mexico's two main drug gangs, who are fighting to control coveted smuggling routes into the United States.

No one had been arrested in either assault.

Hock

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2005, 10:19:49 PM »

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - The United States renewed a travel warning on Tuesday for U.S. citizens crossing the border into Mexico, noting more than 100 murders had occurred in the border region since June.
U.S. renews Mexico travel warning as killings mount 
 
The U.S. ambassador in Mexico, Tony Garza, said that with violence showing no sign of abating, the travel warning issued twice by Washington since the start of the year had been extended and would be reviewed as necessary.

"The Mexican government is beginning to address concerns about the unacceptable level of violence along our border. Nevertheless, more than 100 violent deaths have occurred along the border since June," Garza said.

"Eighteen Nuevo Laredo policemen were killed this year, including eight in July. These disturbing reports make clear that Mexico needs to do much more to bring safety and security to our common border."

Mexico, which has reacted angrily to previous travel alerts and accused Washington of interfering in its business, retorted with a short statement saying it was continuing its efforts to fight organized crime.

"As it has reiterated on various occasions, the government maintains a constant fight against organized crime and is undertaking a series of actions to quell violence on the border," the foreign ministry said in a short statement.

Violence in northern Mexico has soared this year, leaving at least 600 dead, after President Vicente Fox launched a "mother of all battles" on drug gangs fighting turf battles there. Fox sent hundreds of anti-drug troops to the area in June after a spate of police shootings in border cities, where cartels from the western state of Sinaloa are battling local Gulf cartel rivals for control of the cross-border cocaine, marijuana and amphetamine trade.

One of the worst trouble spots is Nuevo Laredo, south of Laredo, Texas, where dozens of people have been murdered this year and some 30 U.S. citizens have been kidnapped since last August.

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2007, 07:22:25 AM »

Mexican drug gang killers wrap victim in Xmas paper
15 May 2007 19:17:37 GMT
Source: Reuters


 TIJUANA, Mexico, May 15 (Reuters) - Suspected drug gang hitmen killed a man in the seedy northern Mexican border city of Tijuana and wrapped him in Christmas gift-wrap in one of the more unusual of Mexico's daily rash of murders.

The victim, in his 40s but not yet identified, was found dumped in a patch of wasteland on Sunday, bundled up in bedsheets. Police unwrapped the sheets to find he had been taped up in festive wrapping paper with a Christmas tree motif.

The man's eyes were taped over and his body showed two bullet wounds and signs of torture and strangulation, typical of the victims of gangland-style killings that are found in Mexico on a daily basis, local prosecutors said.

"We are not ruling out that this is a message related to organized crime," a spokesman for the local attorney general's office said, but stressed the investigation was still in the early stage.

Mexico is in the grip of a bloody turf war between rival drug cartels that is killing some half-a-dozen people every day, keeping up last year's relentless pace of violence.

A crackdown by thousands of troops and federal police sent to trouble spots by President Felipe Calderon has not curbed the violence so far, and murders of police and, most recently, soldiers, are on the rise.

Suspected drug hitmen killed a top official at the national attorney general's office on Monday, shooting him in the face while he was driving to work in Mexico City.

The chief of the AFI elite police force in northwestern Baja California state was also found dead on Monday with gunshot wounds and his severed finger placed on his chest.

Another man was found by a highway in northern Mexico wrapped in plastic, his hands tied, and a message on his body that appeared to be a warning to the Gulf cartel, media said.

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2007, 06:33:51 AM »

MONTERREY, Mexico (Reuters) -

Hundreds of police in a Mexican city near the U.S. border refused to work for a second day on Tuesday, demanding more pay and protection from increased attacks by drug hitmen.
 
Municipal police in Torreon, a city of about 500,000 people in Coahuila state, blocked patrol cars from going on duty and left the city largely unprotected in an attempt to win more money and better weapons.

"Police have been murdered, with limbs cut off and bodies burned. What we want is more forces with the right equipment, working bulletproof vests and a decent salary and pension," said patrolman Oscar Ramirez, speaking from Torreon's deserted police headquarters.

Battles between security forces and drug gangs have intensified since President Felipe Calderon deployed the army to hotspots around the country in December.

In recent weeks, gangs of well-armed hitmen have stepped up kidnappings, murders and large-scale assaults against police and troops.

State police in nearby Nuevo Leon also went on strike on Monday morning but quickly returned to work after bosses promised better hours and a possible wage increase. Earlier in the day, hitmen in the state capital of Monterrey fired on a police patrol and a transit officer was shot dead in a suburb.

Mexico's poorly paid and undertrained police are often accused of working for wealthy drug traffickers, who corrupt them with offers of "silver or lead" -- cash backed by threats of violence.

In April, soldiers in Nuevo Leon arrested 141 officers, saying they were in the pocket of the powerful Gulf cartel.

The army has confiscated hundreds of pistols and assault rifles from local police departments in other towns.

Speaking at a security conference in the neighboring state of Chihuahua, Calderon called for Mexicans to support embattled security forces throughout the country.

"Now citizens also need to protect the police, who are constantly hounded by pressure, threats, blackmail and corruption from criminals," he said.

Hock

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2007, 09:54:21 PM »

Mexican police find 17 corpses dumped in cars, garbage bags
 
 
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Police found 17 corpses stuffed in cars or dumped on streets in garbage bags across Mexico on Monday in what appeared to be the latest wave of violence by drug gangs.
In the resort city of Cancun, the bodies of three men and two women were found in an SUV, Quintana Roo state police said in a news release. The victims' heads were covered in tape and their hands bound behind their backs, it said. One of the male victims was dressed in women's clothes.

Police spokesman Antonio Coral said he could not immediately confirm the causes of death.

In Mexico City, police found three corpses in an SUV parked in a middle-class neighborhood.

Mexico City Attorney General said the deaths appeared to be linked to a turf war between drug gangs as a note was found with the bodies threatening an alleged trafficker called "Chango Mendez."

FIND MORE STORIES IN: Police | Mexico | Mexican | SUV | Mexico City | Cartel | Sinaloa | Culiacan | Zetas
Another two corpses were found in a car in the city of Iguala, about 160 kilometers (100 miles) south of the capital. A note next in the car threatened Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, the alleged head of the Sinaloa Cartel who escaped from a federal prison in 2001.

Three burned bodies were also found in two cars in the Sinaloan city of Culiacan, while four more bodies were found in garbage bags in the central city of Taxco and the port city of Veracruz on the Gulf of Mexico.

Federal investigators say the Sinaloa cartel is fighting a bloody turf war with the Gulf Cartel and their army of enforcers known as the Zetas over billion-dollar (euro) drug trafficking routes to the United States.

Recently, there have been a wave of killings with notes threatening Zetas. In one video posted on the website Youtube, a man was shown being beheaded alongside the message "Do something for your country, kill a Zeta!"

Drug-related violence killed more than 2,000 people across Mexico last year.

President Felipe Calderon, who took power in December, has launched a nationwide offensive against the gangs, sending 24,000 federal police and soldiers to areas ravaged by violence.

But killings have continued unabated. According to a tally kept by Mexico City daily El Universal there have been more than 700 drug slayings since January.

Mexico's Attorney General Eduardo Medina Mora said the United States needs to do more to stop guns and drug money heading south fueling Mexican drug violence. The vast majority of arms used by the soldiers of drug cartels are smuggled from the United States, he said.

Analysts estimate that Mexican drug gangs make between US$10 billion (euro7.4 billion) and US$30 billion (euro22 billion) selling cocaine, heroin, marijuana and methamphetamine to the U.S. market, rivaling the money Mexico makes from oil exports and foreign tourism.
 

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2010, 04:27:43 PM »

When I started this thread in 2005, with explaining the Mexico Escape simulated ammo module, the Tex-Mex and cartel news was just beginning and a bit hard to find. Now its everywhere.

Hock

grlaun

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2010, 07:29:05 PM »

I love this scenario. Everybody dies.  Makes you think out of the box VERY quickly.  Great training!!
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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #14 on: September 01, 2010, 08:40:54 PM »

HOLY CRAP!

Look at this training video before it becomes sealed for non-police.

http://www.policeone.com/policeonetv/videos/2475235-kyle-lamb-movement-formation-vs-fighting-formation/

SOMEBODY FINALLY is pushing the "spread out" method of group movement instead of these asinine diamond pattern and tight group moves that knuckleheads developed after Columbine.

FINALLY! Needless to say I have been preaching this for a decade now.

THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!
Hock

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rutleddc

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Re: The Mexico Escape
« Reply #15 on: September 04, 2010, 02:41:31 PM »

I wonder if this has been driven at all by soldiers who did urban combat overseas, then came home and got into law enforcement?
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