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  • January 22, 2018, 02:18:40 PM
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Author Topic: single stick fighting posture  (Read 2658 times)

Bryant

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single stick fighting posture
« on: April 30, 2008, 02:15:03 PM »

I was shown the following single stick fighting posture by a former correctional officer

baton in forward hand but kept folded back across your lower torso so as not to be grabbed
arm also acts as a shield to the lower torso, lots of quick hit and retract style attacks
to low targets returning the stick to this position
knees bent , light on your feet
rear/empty hand guards the face and upper body

I think this posture works well if your opponent is unarmed
he cant grab your baton and he gets cracked in the knees
if he tries to get close

I think this does not work well if the other person has a baton
difficult to use your baton to block with it held in this retracted fashion
particularly hard to block head shots, you would have to use defensive mobility
if you wanted to remain in that posture

I think I prefer the two handed grip
with the hands near the ends of the baton
you can strike to either side by letting go with one hand
and it is very easy to position well supported blocks

comments?
suggestions?

B.
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Karl

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Re: single stick fighting posture
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2008, 10:26:10 PM »

I normally have my Baton Chambered on my right shoulder.
Left hand near the chest area, and Left Foot forward.
I found this to work for me to defend, or attack.
Use the Baton But or full lengh, 19 Inch. To strike, block or Intimidate if necessary.
This also makes it hard for somebody trying to grab my Baton, even if there is more than one Person.
You have to try it out and see how it feels.

The Method your the Correction Gent showed you is the old, Manetmok Method.
I gave up on that after basic Training in 1981, as Correction officer.
It is taught as Police authorized Baton Training in Security, in N.S.W. Australia.

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oz man

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Re: single stick fighting posture
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2008, 12:20:45 AM »

Maybe try thinking of it in the same way you would a knife.

Against another knife you would have weapon hand forward, against an unarmed opponent you may switch it to your rear hand to lessen the chance of opponent seizing the weapon.

There is a strong link between these weapons, how its being held aswell as footwork.
For me personally, i think they have helped each other fall into place in my training because of these similarities.
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WTAC

  • Aaron Warren
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Re: single stick fighting posture
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2008, 03:55:36 AM »

Are you looking for a better technique for corrections personal? Or trying to adapt the technique for outside of corrections/jail use?
Aaron

I was shown the following single stick fighting posture by a former correctional officer

baton in forward hand but kept folded back across your lower torso so as not to be grabbed
arm also acts as a shield to the lower torso, lots of quick hit and retract style attacks
to low targets returning the stick to this position
knees bent , light on your feet
rear/empty hand guards the face and upper body

I think this posture works well if your opponent is unarmed
he cant grab your baton and he gets cracked in the knees
if he tries to get close

I think this does not work well if the other person has a baton
difficult to use your baton to block with it held in this retracted fashion
particularly hard to block head shots, you would have to use defensive mobility
if you wanted to remain in that posture

I think I prefer the two handed grip
with the hands near the ends of the baton
you can strike to either side by letting go with one hand
and it is very easy to position well supported blocks

comments?
suggestions?

B.
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Hock

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Re: single stick fighting posture
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2008, 06:41:10 AM »

Knife and also stick fighting positions or standoff/showdown methods

(as you know, I don't lke the use of the word stance, a stance is used in about 1/6 of combat encounters, and maybe less,  yet over-worked anf over-emphasized to death in martial arts training - like the old saying goes - there is no basketball scoring stance. No touchdown stance) Combat is balance and power in motion.


  1) weapon forward
  2) weapon back
  3) weapon (and body) neutral
  4) knee high, either hand ready
  5) down and on your back
  6) down and on your sides

It is likely a person in combat will pass through these positions  (like first three while standing and moving, as one leg and one shoulder constantly trades front positions. )

The weapon hand back is decent when the opponent has no weapon because the hand can be used a bit more safely.

The biggest missing link in knife and stick systems is the lack of groundfighting. Without weapon groundfighting the course/program is incomplete and faulty in thinking.

But back on discussion - I have suffered through the lame PPCT and ASP courses (it is said that one ripped off the other, but who?) and stood like a proper student in their stick stances and the way they hold their sticks? I would never do and never have.

Why positions, why the mention of 1/6 usage. Take a look at the real fight. Statistically it has 6 charging in and stop-point probabilities

The Stop 6  Showdown, 4 Standing Stops, the ground-down
  1) Showdown stand-off
  2) Hand stops
  3) Forearm-stops
  4) Shoulder stops
  5) Clinches stops
  6) Ground fighting

In which of the six, is there a chance for a photo/statue stance? Weapon forward, weapon back? Neutral? In the first one. the standoff "showdown."

Fighting stances exist for two reasons. To scare and intimadate in the showdown/standoff - which is what I mean about "being used 16 of the time." 
To organize training classes and get people in position to practice.

Over-obsessing of a fight stance is when the "Myth of the Duel" starts kicking in. The false subtle message that fight training starts with both guys from your school, karate stance. Look at two boxers, two JKD, two wing chun, two head-bobbing grappers...etc.

If you are in law enforcement or corrections, there are a few more chances for a standoff showdown confrontation. But looking back, there are so many times in my life that if popped up into a fighting stance, or let the other guy pop up into his fighting stance? It was already too late! Within common sense reason - I never want to go toe-to-toe with anybody up and ready in their fighting stance. If I can't cheat, I can't win. Watch for flying lamps...(and there is no lamp holding fighting stance)

Anyway...some random brain droppings on the stance subject...
Hock
 

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