General Category > Gun Fighting

How To Shoot More Effectively In CQB + A New CQB Study

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Hock:
Nice but....debate-able to some of the "old timers." A reply to my statement:


"My basic objection to heavy sims training is based on what I observed in the martial arts; those who spent inordinate amounts of time on free-sparring, and not enough on keeping the basics, were a simple, if frustrating experience: That is, they were highly enthusiastic losers in free-sparring against disciplined, basics-trained opponents.
    Almost regardless of style or mental approach, they were a flurry of sloppy, enthusiastic, techniques that were a hazard more from the volume than the skill level. Sims, unless very carefully directed, risks turning into a messy equivalent of lasertag, and risks building bad habits. To keep it on track requires oversight, supervision and work. Just letting students "figure it out with sims" is almost certain to lead to poor results.
"
                                                                                      - Notable Gun Guy


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My repsonse:

"Would you have all martial people than pass on interactive sparring and just hit pads then? No, of course not. To advance, you recreate combat scenarios. Scenario training is training at the highest level. The key is to reduce the abstract. Range shooting is abstract.
Situational, interactive shooting lessons the abstract. Reduce the abstract. Make it as real as real can get.

You must do both. This the 15/45 minute split idea. After a person "qualifies with basics," then subsequently always do/review the live-fire, basics for 15 minutes and sims for 45 minutes. And no. You donít just let them figure it out for themselves.

It has to be organized and supervised with a good after action review. The more real the bullet, the more real it seems to get. But, it takes a whole other level of instructor skills. Itís a way higher, more complicated level than paper target, range instruction.
Poor results in sims is the instructors fault for being inept, not the concept of sims shooting. Just like with kick-boxing.

I will use anything to pass on specific, critical, training point to students, even rubber band guns if I have too. Itís an interactive tool. And I have been doing so since 1995. At first, I was ridiculed for "playing with toys." But, attendees fight over the gun standing and on the ground and better understand lines of fire and reality. Now when I teach officers, I may sell up to 50 rubber band guns each session. The new breed "gets it." They get the idea. The idea is, "you are not really learning how to gunfight unless someone is shooting back at you."

Something we all already, deep down, know anyway.

And worse. Sparring is not much like a real street fight either! The basics for one might not fight the basics for another. The definition of sloppy and proper is very subjective to the goal or mission. As I have taught this simulated ammo training since 1995 and with thousands of new and vet students with everything from rubber band guns to the actual, painful Sims, I am really seeing a need to reverse-engineer the definition of "gun-shooting basics," in some cases. Making the basics better fit the situation from the very start. Reality is, or should be the starting point.   

But this is like...another discussion a bit off the original subject.

                                                                                               - Hock

grlaun:
Yep.  Sims made our active shooter training 2 weeks ago a LOT more real.  People running around trying to shoot you, or hide and you have to find them, sure puts a lot more stress on you than shooting a paper target while getting shouted at - something about not wanting to die/lose...

Lots of review and evaluation - where to step, etc... I got dinged for stepping front of one of our team members while working with a suspect.  I effectively cut off their ability to zero in on the person.  To my defense, I couldn't see sh*t because my mask had fogged up due to the stress of running around and the adrenaline flowing, sure its not much of one, but its all I got...

Canuk:
extremly good points Hock! sims training isn't random play, it needs to be designed with intent be well thought out and controlled. Almost like chaos we rules and comes down to the instuctor. Wher ehave the skills gone that we learnt as kids? I mean we alll played sports and we didnt just practice slapping the puck or running holding onto a ball, we actually played games in training in the hopes we did better on the ice or the field. I also remeber playing "war" using sling shots and later bb guns. This taught you the difference between cover and concleament and what it was like to be shot at and at 10 years it was as real as it could get!

Canuk:

--- Quote from: grlaun on October 23, 2009, 08:23:51 AM ---Yep.  Sims made our active shooter training 2 weeks ago a LOT more real.  People running around trying to shoot you, or hide and you have to find them, sure puts a lot more stress on you than shooting a paper target while getting shouted at - something about not wanting to die/lose...

Lots of review and evaluation - where to step, etc... I got dinged for stepping front of one of our team members while working with a suspect.  I effectively cut off their ability to zero in on the person.  To my defense, I couldn't see sh*t because my mask had fogged up due to the stress of running around and the adrenaline flowing, sure its not much of one, but its all I got...

--- End quote ---

masks fog up, its what they do

Hock:
Part 2 of the Study is done. Check the bolded line...shouldn't surprise free thinkers
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Major new study: How your eyes can cast your fate in a gunfight
Part 1 of a 2-part series

A major new study by the Force Science Research Center for the first time has identified exactly how the "gaze patterns" of officers who are likely to win gunfights differ from those who are likely to lose them. Winners, it is revealed, tend to anticipate an emerging threat sooner, shoot to stop it faster and more accurately, and make fewer errors in judgment because of the unique way in which they watch a potential attacker's body as a deadly confrontation unfolds.
A key finding:

Those who win lethal assaults do so, in part, because they achieve target acquisition with their firearm in a way that is directly opposite of how most officers are trained.

"This unique study shows that winning a gunfight involves more than just issues of action and reaction times," FSRC's executive director Dr. Bill Lewinski told Force Science News."

Hock

 

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