Important Links

Hock's Blog

Hock's Downloads

CQC-Facebook

Hock's Facebook

Hock's Seminars

Hock's Shopsite

Hock's Web Page


New Products

Combat Kicks VID

Critical Contact VID

Death Grip of Knife VID

Dominant/Counter VID

First Contact VID

Impact Weapons Book

Knife Book

The Other Hand VID


Lauric Enterprises, Inc.
1314 W. McDermott
Ste 106-811
Allen, TX 75013
972-390-1777

 

 

 


W. Hock Hochheim's

           Combat Centric

Talk Forum for Military, Police, Martial Artists and Aware Citizenry



Hock Hochheim's Combat Talk Forum

  • July 17, 2018, 06:35:00 PM
  • Welcome, Guest
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: reality in training  (Read 3624 times)

whitewolf

  • Level 4
  • *****
  • Posts: 4695
reality in training
« on: November 19, 2009, 11:30:02 PM »

Guys here is a question for all the instructors out there=
We continually practise defenses against a club/knife/bottle-the attacker starts the
attack-we counter and apply our tactic weither it is block-strike-go into sweep or what ever -Do we ever tell the attacker to change the direction or angle half way through the attack to see if we can also change direction to defend?

Tonight we were working on knife defense and as the attacker started the rubber knife was stabbing but he moved the blade to sort of a inside position and would have sliced the arm-the defense tactic was continued anyway but i feel that the wound would have
diabled the victim-so what i am saying should we do more practise this way?

thoughts please-
WW
Logged

Karl

  • Level 2
  • ***
  • Posts: 91
Re: reality in training
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2009, 12:57:40 AM »

Hi WW

I think you just answered your own Question.

sliced the arm, but i feel that the wound would have disabled the victim-

In my Opinion: the reason you practice Static Knife defense, so people get used to the knife and for Eye Hand Coordination.

Of course you should investigate how the attack was different to the others and how you can circumvent it, if possible.
Logged

Mick Coup

  • Level 1
  • **
  • Posts: 31
  • Peasant
Re: reality in training
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2009, 03:09:00 AM »

Mate,

Shit happens in all fights - you are going to 'eat' a couple of shots most times, and if the guy is armed with a knife this unfortunately means getting cut or stuck most likely.

A common flaw as I see it in most anti/counter knife material is having an unreal expectation - the systems that guarantee that knife not touching you could in theory guarantee that a fist didn't touch you either, and therefore you could win every boxing title on the planet!  Never going to happen.

Priority is to keep the camera rolling and finish the job - knife wounds are rarely going to immediately incapacitate, but if you sustain one, or several, there is no 'reset button' like in the training hall, so you have to factor this into your training and continue no matter what happens - then have some solid postvention protocols for self-aid, summoning help and getting to medical professionals .

Mick

Dawg

  • Level 4
  • *****
  • Posts: 729
Re: reality in training
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2009, 10:19:42 AM »

Guys here is a question for all the instructors out there=
We continually practise defenses against a club/knife/bottle-the attacker starts the
attack-we counter and apply our tactic weither it is block-strike-go into sweep or what ever -Do we ever tell the attacker to change the direction or angle half way through the attack to see if we can also change direction to defend?

WW

In Hock's knife material, one of the counters to common blocks used against your knife attack is to redirect your slash or stab to another line of attack.
For example:

As the trainee slashes from a 12 o'clock angle, trainer blocks the attack.
Before trainee reaches the block, attack is redirected on another clock angle (3 o'clock perhaps?).
Perform same drill at 3, 6, and 9 o'clock angles.

The next step would be to defend against these redirects.
For example:
Trainer slashes at 12 o'clock angle, trainee blocks.
As trainer redirects blade on another line of attack, trainee reacts (we try to end up in a chain-of-the-knife type defense here).
Great for increasing reaction time. When this starts getting too easy for you, have the trainer resist a little more and end up in a "In the clutches of" or ground situation and work on solutions to all the fun  stuff that reveals itself during the struggle.

Once you get the hang of doing this on the four clock angles, you might want to try it using Hock's 12 angle drill. This is a blast and can become as challenging as you want it to be.

There's a lot more formats and drills in Hock's material, this is just part of one of them. My guys have been using his stuff for about four years now and have yet to become bored with it. Have fun! ;D
Logged
"Whether you're paranoid or not, they're coming for you."  - Dawg

Hock

  • Administrator
  • Level 4
  • *****
  • Posts: 6372
    • www.HocksCQC.com
Re: reality in training
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2009, 10:40:08 AM »

"Tell the attacker to change the angle?"

Thats the very simple fake. You strike on the combat clock angles, then stop that angle, (the fake) and attack on another angle. Right on the four basic clock corners or the advanced 12 clock numbers.

The same thing is practiced by the other person with who sees a block to his attack and "redirectd on another line - which is "Counters to Common Blocks" that dawg described.

Faking on the combat clock with stabs and slash attacks as well as empty hand.

Start a newer person out with the regular, non-fakes angles of attack.
Then add fakes. The cure is to stay tight and alert for all angles and "tricks." Over-reacting and over-blocking will set up too many openings.

If your student never sees fakes? They will be fooled by them. Just like a baseball hitter who never sees a curveball. A 'scientific" program tries to ensure formulas for the common and then the uncommon possibilties in a continuum.

All part of classroom workouts. Thats why God made regular classes. Do this with stick attacks and knife attacks until the student has a working knowledge of all the "curveballs."

Hock
« Last Edit: November 20, 2009, 11:02:39 AM by Hock »
Logged

whitewolf

  • Level 4
  • *****
  • Posts: 4695
Re: reality in training
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2009, 08:42:19 PM »




all=thanks- makes sense to me-was thinking along those lines but you confirmed it.
WW (ELB) "speed of light"









all- thanks-
all
Logged

michael

  • Level 3
  • ****
  • Posts: 221
Re: reality in training
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2009, 11:46:37 PM »

Good post by Hock above. IMO, the only way to get really good (as good as you can) at blocking or parrying a knife is to learn to REALLY use the knife well. One improves the other.
Logged
**To be a warrior is not a simple matter of wishing to be one. It is rather an endless struggle that will go on to the very last moment of our lives. Nobody is born a warrior, in exactly the same way that nobody is born an average man. We make ourselves into one or the other.** Carlos Castaneda

Crafty

  • Level 2
  • ***
  • Posts: 88
Re: reality in training
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2009, 04:03:05 PM »

Use a real blade but make sure its not sharp enough to cut try not to let your training partner know that the blade is blunt.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2009, 04:08:03 PM by Crafty »
Logged

whitewolf

  • Level 4
  • *****
  • Posts: 4695
Re: reality in training
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2009, 05:40:43 PM »

all great ideas- how about doing the same for unarmed strike/defense-i assume it would be basically the same-right? WW (ELB) "speed of ight"
Logged

Hock

  • Administrator
  • Level 4
  • *****
  • Posts: 6372
    • www.HocksCQC.com
Re: reality in training
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2009, 06:54:35 PM »

Yeeeeeessssssss.
You do really need to train with us more.
No excuses now...since you are back in the US of A.

Hock

whitewolf

  • Level 4
  • *****
  • Posts: 4695
Re: reality in training
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2009, 06:57:10 PM »

Yes sir-WW (ELB) "speed of light"
Logged
 

Download