Hock Hochheim's Combat Talk Forum

General Category => Unarmed Combatives => Topic started by: whitewolf on February 05, 2012, 11:02:01 AM

Title: Teaching a new student
Post by: whitewolf on February 05, 2012, 11:02:01 AM
Last night I had a new female student-never had any type training.
To   show rudements of striking i put her in a stance -hands up-showed her how to grip the fist and then i demoed the first-Jab but i actually took my right hand around her wrist-had her do the jab slowly and held her other hand up where it should be and talked her through the use of hip and correct use of feet-we did  this about 5-6 times and then let her do it alone-then redid it and then let her hit the hand pads-it seemed to work as i coud correct breathing-tenseness-and stop the "hopping "-did the same for the cross.-and upper cut-today ill show her how to add a knee to the defense- Any thoughts from the boxers out there
any thoughts from the boxers out there-R/S WW
Title: Re: Teaching a new student
Post by: Hock on February 05, 2012, 11:33:11 AM
Unless its boxing?
Don't start with a jab.

Hock
Title: Re: Teaching a new student
Post by: whitewolf on February 05, 2012, 04:52:20 PM
Hock- thanks-also showing her using the palm to push away-same principle -and adding the  left or right vertical forearm block  to inside and comming over with other palm-fist-or hammer fist to face or---run like hell- ;D WW
Title: Re: Teaching a new student
Post by: F. Fuller on March 09, 2012, 01:58:03 PM
Chiming in for the first time here...

Starting from zero, we have always taught the power shot in as non telegraphic a manner as possible. The jab as used in boxing tends to be more of a range-finder or distraction. We will progress to that eventually once skill has been developed and the student has learned how to hit accurately and develop speed and power. Generally hands open... palm heel or open hand to hard targets or fist to soft.
Title: Re: Teaching a new student
Post by: whitewolf on March 09, 2012, 09:59:47 PM

fuller-welcome- and thanks for input-WW
Title: Re: Teaching a new student
Post by: F. Fuller on March 09, 2012, 10:13:02 PM
Thanks for the welcome. Nice forum. :)
Title: Re: Teaching a new student
Post by: whitewolf on March 10, 2012, 06:23:24 AM
I usuallly show -from a passive defense -one forearm is the initial block as the other palm strikes (or fist)- at the same time-then depending on the physical strength or ability to move (due to age or problem) continue with knee or kick to lower  targets-and get out-
New student is shown angle blocking (from Hocks method of bocking)-i call it blocking the clock. We go from there. WW
Title: Re: Teaching a new student
Post by: Samspade on March 11, 2012, 12:22:29 PM
Just correctly hitting the bag open hand, front snap kick, and fingers work out from there.  Not too much too soon this could be a month's worth of work alone.  I don't know her or why she wants to learn what are her goals or what yours goals are of couse. 
Title: Re: Teaching a new student
Post by: whitewolf on March 11, 2012, 01:29:32 PM
Goals of the students vary-from just learning , taking a course because they never took any or------they have been assaulted,threatened, or bothered andwant to feel empowered to defend them selves-additionally
military (who do  not like army combatatives) and police officers who do not get enough or any self defense training.-WW
Title: Re: Teaching a new student
Post by: szorn on March 23, 2012, 05:59:46 PM
I haven't been around the forums for quite some time so hope you don't mind some input from a "newbie", sort of.

As Hock mentioned, don't start with a jab. If you are working with a new student, particularly a female, punching in general may not be the best tool to begin with. Give a new student tools that are easier to learn and require less overall skill. Open-hand techniques are generally more natural, easier to learn, and easier to retain, especially for new students. Everyone has a basic understanding of how to push a person away from them, or how to push a door open, etc. So, pushing-based movements with the open hand are ideal starter techniques. Obviously we have to make the distinction between pushing and striking but I think you get what I mean.

Steve
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