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W. Hock Hochheim's

           Combat Centric

Talk Forum for Military, Police, Martial Artists and Aware Citizenry



Hock Hochheim's Combat Talk Forum

  • December 02, 2020, 04:14:59 PM
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 1 
 on: February 03, 2020, 07:56:31 AM 
Started by Hock - Last post by Hock
SFC Testing - We Are Now The College Approach

Simply put? Now, you do not have to take our modules in order. You can complete course levels out of order.

I am already scheduling seminars for 2020, my 24th year on the road.  In some circumstances, I may only return to a city around the world in a year and a half now, not every year. Worse, complicating the mission, I really am consistently asked for rank progressions and instructorships. Squeezing all this in, IN PROMOTIONAL ORDER for each person, is just about impossible to schedule.

Every single thing I teach is a course we have. We have 7 courses. Hand, Stick, Knife. Gun. CQC Group (which is the combination of the hand, stick, knife and gun courses) PAC/Filipino and Police Judo. But the core and most popular courses are the hand, stick, knife and gun programs. Four main courses.

Though there are ten levels in each course, the tenth is a big test, so there are 9 levels of study in each course. That's nine times four. 36 levels. 36 modules. Granted the modules are short and simple, but they take time to do, to teach and get to. Getting to them all, for everyone gets harder and harder each year. In a perfect world, like the perfect college schedule, you would start with "Subject 101" and proceed in perfect order, on through the "Subject 400s." Ever done that? Who do you know that has? It is next to impossible.

When folks go to college, they do the best they can. They take the subjects and classes that are open to them at the time, wrestling with both their schedules and the college-scheduled offerings. This means a college student may actually start in class "Subject 105," rather than "Subject 101" because the 101 class is full. (I actually took all my senior level business courses first!. Yes! As a night student no one seemed to care. So I took "401, 402- on up." Took the others later as I could get them.) And fact is we are not even a real "college-college." We are just some certification courses, some training courses. We are not even a martial "art." So, you can achieve out of order.

Complete any three levels? You can become an instructor. Instructors can teach ANY SFC level material, but only promote people in the levels they tested for. Any six levels? Any nine levels? And so on. Another simple way to put this, if on any given Sunday I teach Knife 6 and you complete it successfully? You can get official credit for Knife 6, even though you haven't finished knife 5. We'll all catch up with everything you in the end.

This will facilitate more people to achieve what they deserve this way, given our constricted opportunities.

Some courses have prerequisites. Seen this before? "Must Take Class 301 Before Class 308." Fortunately, in my practical/tactical course modules, these subjects are not brain surgery or rocket science, nor are they fancy, difficult katas, high jinks or high kicks. They are simply basic, simple things spaced out over time, because not all things can fit in level 1 or "101." Plus we expect people will already be working with their local instructors, have the training videos, and also have experience (most folks I see, have experience) in a variety of systems and schools.

So now, simply put? You do not have to take or test for our modules in strict order. Nice if you would? Best if you would. But like college, you can complete course levels out of order.

And, of course, you can simple train in all of this for knowledge only, never taking any tests at all. The choice is always yours.

 2 
 on: February 03, 2020, 07:55:50 AM 
Started by Hock - Last post by Hock
SFC Testing - We Are Now The College Approach

Simply put? Now, you do not have to take our modules in order. You can complete course levels out of order.

I am already scheduling seminars for 2020, my 24th year on the road.  In some circumstances, I may only return to a city around the world in a year and a half now, not every year. Worse, complicating the mission, I really am consistently asked for rank progressions and instructorships. Squeezing all this in, IN PROMOTIONAL ORDER for each person, is just about impossible to schedule.

Every single thing I teach is a course we have. We have 7 courses. Hand, Stick, Knife. Gun. CQC Group (which is the combination of the hand, stick, knife and gun courses) PAC/Filipino and Police Judo. But the core and most popular courses are the hand, stick, knife and gun programs. Four main courses.

Though there are ten levels in each course, the tenth is a big test, so there are 9 levels of study in each course. That's nine times four. 36 levels. 36 modules. Granted the modules are short and simple, but they take time to do, to teach and get to. Getting to them all, for everyone gets harder and harder each year. In a perfect world, like the perfect college schedule, you would start with "Subject 101" and proceed in perfect order, on through the "Subject 400s." Ever done that? Who do you know that has? It is next to impossible.

When folks go to college, they do the best they can. They take the subjects and classes that are open to them at the time, wrestling with both their schedules and the college-scheduled offerings. This means a college student may actually start in class "Subject 105," rather than "Subject 101" because the 101 class is full. (I actually took all my senior level business courses first!. Yes! As a night student no one seemed to care. So I took "401, 402- on up." Took the others later as I could get them.) And fact is we are not even a real "college-college." We are just some certification courses, some training courses. We are not even a martial "art." So, you can achieve out of order.

Complete any three levels? You can become an instructor. Instructors can teach ANY SFC level material, but only promote people in the levels they tested for. Any six levels? Any nine levels? And so on. Another simple way to put this, if on any given Sunday I teach Knife 6 and you complete it successfully? You can get official credit for Knife 6, even though you haven't finished knife 5. We'll all catch up with everything you in the end.

This will facilitate more people to achieve what they deserve this way, given our constricted opportunities.

Some courses have prerequisites. Seen this before? "Must Take Class 301 Before Class 308." Fortunately, in my practical/tactical course modules, these subjects are not brain surgery or rocket science, nor are they fancy, difficult katas, high jinks or high kicks. They are simply basic, simple things spaced out over time, because not all things can fit in level 1 or "101." Plus we expect people will already be working with their local instructors, have the training videos, and also have experience (most folks I see, have experience) in a variety of systems and schools.

So now, simply put? You do not have to take or test for our modules in strict order. Nice if you would? Best if you would. But like college, you can complete course levels out of order.

And, of course, you can simple train in all of this for knowledge only, never taking any tests at all. The choice is always yours.

 3 
 on: April 06, 2017, 06:47:15 AM 
Started by usks1 - Last post by Hock
I. John Farnam on “Deanimation”: A dicey challenge where anything can happen
Officers have long been advised to “expect the unexpected” in armed confrontations. That admonition certainly holds true when it comes to “deanimation,” a threatening subject’s cessation of movement after he or she has been shot.
The venerable firearms trainer John Farnam addressed the issue of “rapid and permanent deanimation” in a recent issue of his popular newsletter Dtiquips.
Even with shots to the heart, Farnam wrote, “most cardiologists agree with the ‘five-second rule.’ When blood pressure drops [suddenly] to near zero, most people will still remain animated for at least five more seconds before becoming comatose. And ‘five seconds’ is the minimum. Some cardiologists insist the real figure is closer to 10 seconds or more”—an eternity in a gunfight.
Individual physiological and psychological factors enter the equation, Farnam noted. Some people fall down when shot (even in non-vital places) for no reason other than that they want to. They literally ‘act out’ what they think they’re supposed to do, absent any external physical compulsion.”
Then, too, there’s “the nebulous issue of ‘neural-shock paralysis.’ Sometimes it’s there,” Farnam said, “and sometimes it’s not, all for reasons no one really understands. [It] cannot be predicted nor produced on demand.”
Readers responded with dramatic anecdotes attesting to the erratic nature of “shootee reactions.”
A private investigator and firearms consultant recalled a case he’d handled that involved a 6-ft. 4-in., 220-pounder who, thanks to his constant workouts in state prison, “was built like an action-figure doll.” He was shot in the upper shoulder with one .25-cal. semi-auto round. “Witnesses reported that upon the single shot being fired this giant fell as if he had been pole-axed!”
In contrast came this, from an attorney and frequent expert witness in shooting cases:
In one of his cases, police fired over 60 rounds at a PCP suspect, “and the autopsy detailed 45 separate wound paths through [his] body. The suspect, with pistol in hand, took 11 steps toward police, while being simultaneously struck by a hail of police handgun bullets, until a shotgun slug that struck his spine between T6/T7 dropped him to the pavement.
“Even then, his upper body remained functional, as he tried to point his handgun at police with his right hand, while he held a cigarette [in his left]. It took a 40 S&W round to the brain stem to finally stop this threat.
“In another recent case, the [suspect], shot through his heart with a 9mm and also hit in the thigh and arm, subsequently walked down a hall, down a flight of stairs, across the stair landing, and halfway down another flight of stairs before he collapsed, and thereafter died.
“The medical examiner and I, without speaking with one another, both noted in our reports that a man shot through the heart can subsequently remain upright, mobile, and aggressive for 30 seconds or more!
“While stopping effects [of ammunition] seem to be better now than a few decades ago, there is still no certainty, and two suspects of the same size and physical condition, hit in the same part of the body with the same rounds, may well behave dramatically differently.
“We must train to keep firing accurately, creating distance, using cover and obstacles, reloading, and getting out of the kill zone when possible, until the threat is stopped.”
Farnam added: “We must be mentally prepared to confront nearly any eventuality, from the felon turning and running away, to the felon falling down immediately (albeit sometimes reanimating seconds later), to the felon continuing his attack while displaying scant discomfort.”
And “we need to be cautious about believing glowing reports about ‘wonder bullets.’ ”

 4 
 on: March 20, 2017, 12:49:21 PM 
Started by Hock - Last post by Hock
https://militaryphony.com/2017/03/19/frank-william-dux-cold-case-getting-warmer/

 5 
 on: August 08, 2016, 03:07:05 PM 
Started by Hock - Last post by Hock
Jiyu Yushi -  "For those who may wonder about the above historical tapesrty (replica), it is from the Getty's copy of Fiore dei Liberi's 1410 manuscript: FIOR di BATTAGLIA or FLOWER OF BATTLE. It alleges the main power cuts and thrust for a sword. The accompany "spirit" animals encompass Maestro Fiore's concepts a knight needed for success in battle: The 12 O'clock animal, the Lynx represents the learned and innate sensitivity needed to discern actual correct need to the task, with its subsequent distance, timing and positioning forthcoming from that need. The 3 O'clock animal, the Lion, represents the necessity of a bold and daring heart, as without that, the following applications are worthless. The 6 O'clock animal, the Elephant and castle thereupon perched, symbolizes both unfettered mind and unwavering strength of purpose and application. Too many think it is about physical balance and strength. True Combatants, of which Maestro was one, knows mental balance and mental strength usurp physical strength and balance. The 9 O'clock animal, the Tiger represents adaptability to the ever-changing circumstances of the contextual field of combat. The tiger quickly adapts to this dynamic environment, engaging what must be done as it must be accomplished. Ken Mondschein offers a nice little manual from the Getty-owned manuscript: THE KNIGHTLY ART OF BATTLE."

The 6 O'clock animal, the Elephant and castle thereupon perched, symbolizes both unfettered mind and unwavering strength of purpose and application. Too many think it is about physical balance and strength. True Combatants, of which Maestro was one, knows mental balance and mental strength usurp physical strength and balance.


 6 
 on: July 01, 2016, 12:38:20 PM 
Started by Hock - Last post by Hock
One time awhile back, I had a old-timey karate black belt, system head, guy, tell a student who was both with him and me, say...

"Hock has no finesse."

Actually coming from him, that was a good compliment. His definition of finesse is not one I aspire too.

Beauty and ugly is in the eye of the beholder.

Hock

 7 
 on: March 31, 2016, 06:16:51 PM 
Started by Hock - Last post by Hock
The results of these lawsuits...(what was he thinking!?)
https://www.facebook.com/MichaelYonFanPage/posts/10151422446985665


 8 
 on: February 12, 2016, 11:01:05 AM 
Started by Hock - Last post by Hock
Travis Haley Responds To NDgate

Earlier this evening, Haley Strategic Partners posted this statement on their Facebook page in response to the week old disclosure of video taken by Panteao Productions depicting Travis Haley discussing an AK. During that video, the weapon fired. Panteao Productions issued their statement on Monday of this week.

Press Release Feb 11, 2016:

On approximately Thursday February 4th 2016, Panteao Productions released a video through poor accountability and security with its servers by one of their instructors according to the owner of Panteao Productions. How and why this happened is still unclear, however assumptions can certainly be made.

This particular video was of me teaching a block of instruction on controversial Russian trigger finger/safety techniques, and why I personally don’t recommend them. During the filming, my AK was discharged inadvertently performing the demonstration. The range was set up for this demo, the weapon was intentionally off safe due to the block of instruction, and the barrel was oriented towards the target in the event the weapon fired as it did in this case.

Of course I take these matters seriously and if you know me or have been through any of our courses, you know our number one priority is safety. We pride ourselves on learning from our failure as it is our greatest opportunity and share those experiences with the people we serve.

There was also a communication issue with the inconsistent posts made on social media between the HSP team back in Scottsdale AZ and me being in Central America at the time the video was released. Now that I have seen the entire video (never seen by me before as it was in Panteao’s library), I have been able to review it and now share my thoughts. After reading a lot of comments, I think Pat Rogers said it best:

“One type causes injury/ death or comes close enough to warrant immediate measures to remove the person and his weapon. The other type is a down range ND, when the shot is discharged unintentionally, but into the target/ berm etc. These represent the majority of ND’s and this is where learning can occur. These are teaching/ learning points, and if handled correctly, will not likely happen again.” -Pat Rogers

I have had many failure points in my life (much greater than this)… I have ND’d. I have missed the mark countless times in my life even when it mattered most. I have zigged when I should have zagged. I’ve been impulsive and involved myself into fights without thinking of who’d it effect. My brothers have asked me for direction in combat and I was unable to answer. Hell, I have even taken life when it could have possibly been avoided… I have failed over and over in my life, yet I have been blessed with being accountable and educated by my shortcomings. This, in turn, allows my failures to continually become my greatest opportunities.

Travis Haley
Founder/CEO
Haley Strategic Partners

 9 
 on: February 08, 2016, 05:27:35 PM 
Started by Hock - Last post by Hock
Travis Haley, negligent discharge story. The odd politics of which are quietly parked here on the forum for a history lesson.
 
http://soldiersystems.net/2016/02/08/ndgate/

 10 
 on: February 06, 2016, 03:09:05 AM 
Started by Hock - Last post by Hock
Knife Fighting Film - Knife Stress Quick Draws

The stress quick draw is the bedrock for all the following levels of study. “Getting the knife out!” One of the most important aspects in knife combatives, if not the, first and most important aspects, is drawing/pulling out the knife when you desperately need it. You can't do anything else until and unless you draw the knife out.

In this approximately one hour training film, Hock covers stress quick draw ideas, moves, exercises through the Stop 6 program, as in stand-up problems through ground problems. Plus, this film covers more life-saving information found inside Level One of this internationally practiced knife course.

“We shot the first knife stress draw, VHS video tape in about 1999 in South Africa. It was very well received, however I have learned so much more on the subject since that time. Plus, I have developed the Stop 6 program through the years, an amazing format vehicle through which to organize and exercise stress quick draws. This new film is crammed full of information. I really think it captures the spirit of Knife Level One.” - Hock

In the film, you will find:

. Knife selection tips

. Elbow cues

. Hand cues

. Carry sites - yours and the enemy’s

. 5 reasons why people do and don’t draw after the fight has started

. Draw methods standing through ground problems

. Drawing through the Stop 6

. Legal issues

. Legal recommendations “after the fact” (Hock is not an attorney.  If you need legal advice seek a professional.) 

. Who, what, where, when, how and why?

. Class drills and exercises

. So much more...

"Just wanted to thank you for the wonderful videos that you produced on the topic. I joined your discussion group recently and decided to try your Level 1 video. After buying it and viewing it, I'm sold on your training techniques. I will be proceeding with the entire course. Although I have been studying the traditional martial arts for 12 years now, I think that I will also be giving your Unarmed Series a serious look." - Chuck Callahan

"Hock, coming from law enforcement, I wish to thank you personally for the material you have presented in video format, and look forward to using more of what you have to present. I wish to thank you for your open-minded views on other instructors. I know that, you too, have so much to present, to keep me coming home to my family in one piece and help me stay out of hot water." - HapkidoDoin

"Still the best after 20 years!" Kevin Engstrom, TN, USA

Get more, see more, click here
http://shop.forcenecessary.com/us/Knife-Combat/c/878/Hock-Hochheim-Knife-Stress-Quick-Draws/p/57360

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